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    Postal Code 95688, CA
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    Address 123 Main St, Vacaville, CA
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    Listing ID #123456
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    • 3195 Puffin Cir Fairfield, CA 3195 Puffin Cir, Fairfield, CA Single Family/Single Family for sale. $405,000 
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  • Sold Listings

    Here is a list of properties that I have helped clients buy or sell.

    7685 Pleasants Valley Rd, Vacaville, CA Single Family/Single Family sold.
    25
    Contingent
    Single Family/Single Family
    4 Bd / 3F/0H Ba
    4811 sq. ft.,  1 Stories
    Listing #: 21507512
    1422 Shasta St, Suisun City, CA Single Family/Single Family sold.
    29
    Sold
    Single Family/Single Family
    2 Bd / 2F/0H Ba
    1130 sq. ft.,  1 Stories
    Listing #: 21602594
    Sold: 3/23/2016
    150 Terrybrook Ln, Vallejo, CA Single Family/Single Family sold.
    48
    Sold
    Single Family/Single Family
    4 Bd / 2F/1H Ba
    1909 sq. ft.
    Listing #: 21602152
    Sold: 4/8/2016
    2035 Swan Ct, Fairfield, CA Single Family/Single Family sold.
    27
    Sold
    Single Family/Single Family
    4 Bd / 2F/0H Ba
    1285 sq. ft.,  1 Stories
    Listing #: 21600119
    Sold: 3/9/2016
    1737 Rockville Rd, Fairfield, CA Single Family/Single Family sold.
    25
    Sold
    Single Family/Single Family
    3 Bd / 2F/1H Ba
    2150 sq. ft.,  1 Stories
    Listing #: 21502875
    Sold: 12/30/2015
  • Real Estate News

    • Tornado Watch? 8 Safety Tips for Homeowners

      Tornadoes threaten the safety of millions of homeowners, as well as damage to property, each year. Residents of areas in the path of the twister must be proactive ahead of its touch-down, starting with the following steps, courtesy of the Red Cross:

      1. Build a disaster kit with enough supplies for at least three days. This kit should include:

      • Battery-Powered or Hand-Crank Radio
      • Copies of Important Documents
      • Extra Batteries
      • First-Aid Kit
      • Flashlight
      • Medications
      • Multi-Purpose Tool
      • Non-Perishable Food
      • Sanitation/Hygiene Items
      • Water

      2. Develop an emergency plan in which each person knows how to reach other members of the household. Include an out-of-area emergency contact person in the plan, and designate a meeting area should you be unable to return home.

      3. Select a safe room, preferably a basement, storm cellar or other window-less interior room on the lowest floor. Be sure all members of the household are aware of its location.

      4. Move outdoor structures, such as hanging plants, lawn furniture or trash cans, inside to prevent wind-caused damage.

      5. Watch for signs of a pending storm, such as darkening skies, green-ish clouds, hail and wind. If you can hear thunder, you may be at risk for lightning damage. Remember: If thunder roars, head indoors.

      6. Know your community’s warning system, and be alert for its signals. Stay abreast of the latest information regarding the storm by listening to a NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Weather Radio or your local news.

      When a tornado hits:

      • Go to the designated safe room, or an underground shelter. If you live in a mobile home, go to the nearest sturdy building. Do not seek shelter in the mobile home’s bathroom or hallway.

      • If caught outdoors, seek shelter in a vehicle. Buckle your seat belt and try driving to the nearest sturdy building. Keep your head down below the windows, if possible. If you can, drive to an area lower than the level of the roadway, exit the vehicle and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.

      For more tornado safety tips, visit the Red Cross online at www.RedCross.org.
       
      Source: American Red Cross

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • What Can Homeowners Do to Prevent the Spread of Zika?

      Mounting concern over Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses has yet to motivate homeowners to take preventative measures, recent reports show, despite the urgency of the outbreak.

      “Unlike Chikungunya and West Nile virus, Zika has been identified as a world health crisis,” says Scott Zide, co-founder of Mosquito Squad. “Removal of standing water is the most essential tactic in mosquito elimination, yet homeowners aren’t actively removing it, which is surprising given mosquito concerns are so high.

      “Although Zika has yet to be transmitted by mosquitoes in the U.S., public health experts do expect that it soon will,” Zide adds, “and we're encouraging homeowners to walk their yards to check for ways to eliminate mosquitoes.”

      Zide recommends these tips:

      Stretch tarps taut. If you have items on your property covered by tarps, ensure they are stretched taut with bungee cords to eliminate the possibility of water accumulating. Inspect tarps over boats, grills, firewood piles, recycling cans and sports equipment, especially.

      Toss any debris, including lawn clippings, leaves and twigs. Debris of any size can provide a prime breeding spot.

      Tip over anything the collects or holds water. Since mosquitoes breed in standing water, dumping the water decreases their breeding ground. Yards with bird baths, catch basins, play sets, portable fire pits or fireplaces and tree houses are the most common collectors.

      Turn over anything that holds water or trash. Items such as empty pots, light fixtures, pet bowls, plastic toys, plant saucers, portable sandboxes, or slides should be turned over or removed, if possible, to reduce risk.

      Treat your home. A professional mosquito elimination barrier treatment around the home and yard can reduce the need for a DEET-containing spray.

      Take care of your home. Regularly assess and clean out gutters, ensuring downspouts are attached properly. Frequently check irrigation systems for leaks, and keep your lawn trimmed and weed-free.

      Talk to your neighbors. Homes in proximity to others, like those in developments or townhomes, may be at risk more so than those with more acreage. Discuss your concerns with your neighbors, and offer to assist with mosquito-repelling tasks as needed.

      Source: Mosquito Squad

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Report: Retirees Happy "Just Getting By"

      Despite economic progress, many retirees are still feeling the aftershocks of the recession—but that hasn’t dampened their spirits.

      “Many American retirees are still recovering from the Great Recession while managing their households with modest retirement incomes,” explains Catherine Collinson, president of the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® (TCRS), which recently released a “State of Retirement” compendium. “The good news is that most retirees are enjoying life, but the concerning news is that many may be ill-equipped to deal with a financial shock, such as the possible need for long-term care.

      “As a society, we frequently speak of the need for workers to save and prepare for retirement,” Collinson continues. “Unfortunately, the conversation often ends once people stop working and retire, which is when it becomes even more critical for them to have a financial plan that can last their lifetimes.”

      Over one-third of retirees included in the TCRS compendium have only “somewhat” recovered from the recession—a finding reflected in the “just getting by” mentality prevalent in the report. Other financial priorities cited in the compendium include paying off a mortgage, saving for retirement and paying off credit card debt.

      Retirees today are living on a modest income: a median of $32,000, according to the TCRS compendium. Social Security is the top source of retirement income, followed by savings and investments, company-funded pension plans, and 401(k)s, 403(b)s and IRAs. Most retirees began collecting Social Security benefits at 62 years old.

      Still, current retirees expect a long retirement, filled with meaningful activities outside of employment. These include spending time with family and friends, pursuing hobbies, traveling, volunteering and caring for grandchildren.

      Overall, the vast majority of retirees included in the compendium are “generally happy,” “enjoying life,” and “have a strong sense of purpose.”

      Source: Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Hoping to Buy a Home? 3 Ways to Up Your Credit Game

      Planning to purchase a home in the next year? Don’t let poor credit dash your hopes!

      Subprime credit—generally between 300 and 600 on the VantageScore scale—can inhibit a buyer’s ability to secure a mortgage. Recent research from TransUnion®, one of the three major credit bureaus, shows many first-time buyers, particularly millennials, are lacking in the credit department: 43 percent of would-be millennial buyers surveyed by the agency have a subprime credit score.

      “Credit scores are a crucial component of the home-buying process, impacting everything from the size of a mortgage payment to the interest rate on a home loan,” says Ken Chaplin, TransUnion’s senior vice president. “People with subprime credit may face financial barriers to homeownership, making it difficult for their dream home to become a reality.

      “The home-buying process begins well before you start looking for real estate,” adds Chaplin. “A credit score, which significantly impacts the home financing process, is built on good spending habits and a pattern of responsible borrowing established over a lifetime.”

      To better your financial circumstances—and your chances of being approved for a mortgage—Chaplin advises the following tips:

      Check your credit report first. Mortgage lenders will look at your credit report and score when you apply for a mortgage. To catch issues before they do, check your report three months before starting the home-buying process. Bear in mind your credit score is built over a lifetime of spending. Keep an eye on your score and track how your spending habits affect it.

      Build credit. Those with low or no credit must build a healthy credit score. This includes paying all bills on time each month and maintaining a low credit utilization ratio, which is a ratio of how much credit you use out of your available credit limit. Other ways to build credit include factoring existing payments into your report, such as student loans (automatically included) and rent.

      Do your homework. Research mortgages and interest rates. While placing a larger down payment will lower your monthly mortgage payment, don’t put down more than you can afford. Keep in mind, also, that you will need money for closing costs, including a home inspection, before you can purchase your home.

      Remember, Chaplin says, that improving your credit can take time. If your finances aren’t in shape for a home now, that doesn’t mean homeownership isn’t a realistic goal for the future. Keep an open mind!

      Source: TransUnion®

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • DIY and ROI: Pricing the Cost and Value of Garage Doors

      Is that home improvement really worth its cost? New garage doors may be!

      According to ContractorQuotes.us, a Web-based contractor referral service, a garage door replacement can increase your home’s value by an average of $1,410. The project costs an average of $1,595, recouping 88.4 percent of your investment.

      One pitfall, however, can skew those numbers unfavorably. Homeowners should avoid making these common mistakes when selecting new garage doors, the site advises:

      • Selecting a style that clashes with your home – Like the front door, garage doors are visible to passersby. Choose a design that complements your home’s exterior style.

      • Neglecting the weather – Are strong winds common in your area? If so, make sure to select a solid garage door that withstands the elements.

      • Installing a garage door without insulation – Insulated garage doors attached to the home lend greater energy-efficiency overall. They keep both cold and warm weather out, resulting in less expense on heating and cooling.

      • Forgoing a professional – Seek the help of a professional to install the new doors. Dealing with the springs can be dangerous for inexperienced homeowners.

      The site features more data related to other home improvements, as well, including how much you can expect to pay for a project, as well as how much of that investment you can expect to regain.

      In our next segment, we'll take a look at the value of replacing entry doors. ‘Till then!

      Published with permission from RISMedia.